A world of your own

Dreaming of a collection inspired by your personal style? Explore our artistic universes and uncover the one made for you.
Discover
A world of your own

White

Filters

Saved search

Your search is accessible from the favorites tab > My favorite searches

Unsaved search

A problem occurred

In just a few clicks, tell us your preferences and discover our recommended works for you

On The slopes of Sugarbush, Slim Aarons

On The slopes of Sugarbush

Slim Aarons

Photography - 29.9 x 20.1 x 0 inch

$3,156

Insta(nt)llation - Cone in globe. 1/3, Eszter Poroszlai

Insta(nt)llation - Cone in globe. 1/3

Eszter Poroszlai

Photography - 11.8 x 11.8 x 1.2 inch

$1,163

Frida Kahlo in the blue house, Coyoacán, Mexico., Leo Matiz

Frida Kahlo in the blue house, Coyoacán, Mexico.

Leo Matiz

Photography - 14 x 10 x 0.1 inch

$1,800

Un Corps dans le Décor #26, Babeth Aloy

Un Corps dans le Décor #26

Babeth Aloy

Photography - 15.7 x 23.6 x 1.2 inch

$720

Revolution square Havana on a wet day, Paul J Bucknall

Revolution square Havana on a wet day

Paul J Bucknall

Photography - 16 x 24 x 0.1 inch

$668

Mary Go Round 1 Jardin des Tuileries, Parisian Night, Pascal Therme

Mary Go Round 1 Jardin des Tuileries, Parisian Night

Pascal Therme

Photography - 19.7 x 27.6 x 0.4 inch

$775

Flower poem: An expression of happiness only (1), Jihun Ju

Flower poem: An expression of happiness only (1)

Jihun Ju

Photography - 23.6 x 23.6 x 0 inch

$599

Body Language 79, Igor Shrayer

Body Language 79

Igor Shrayer

Photography - 26.4 x 39.8 x 1.2 inch

$3,987

Oceani Mentali N°6, Luca Izzo

Oceani Mentali N°6

Luca Izzo

Photography - 31.5 x 23.6 x 0.4 inch

$1,661

The Path, Icy & Sot

The Path

Icy & Sot

Photography - 33.9 x 48.8 x 2 inch

$6,091

Banana leaves #11, Ed Reddon

Banana leaves #11

Ed Reddon

Photography - 46.3 x 23 x 0.4 inch

$1,440

Paris Cathédrale Notre Dame de Paris 5, Bruno Fournier

Paris Cathédrale Notre Dame de Paris 5

Bruno Fournier

Photography - 7.1 x 9.4 x 0.4 inch

$886

Alice Heine (1857-1925), épouse du Prince Albert 1er de Monaco, buste en marbre blanc par Fabio Stecchi (1855-1928), 1892, Carole. Palais Princier de Monaco, Julien Spiewak

Alice Heine (1857-1925), épouse du Prince Albert 1er de Monaco, buste en marbre blanc par Fabio Stecchi (1855-1928), 1892, Carole. Palais Princier de Monaco

Julien Spiewak

Photography - 27.6 x 19.7 x 2 inch

$2,990

Dune II, Tim Hall

Dune II

Tim Hall

Photography - 15 x 15 x 1.6 inch

$1,994

Winter Robin II, Bogdan Boev

Winter Robin II

Bogdan Boev

Photography - 23.6 x 35.4 x 0.1 inch

$365

Le rêveur - série oiseaux, Henry Ausloos

Le rêveur - série oiseaux

Henry Ausloos

Photography - 15.7 x 23.6 x 0 inch

$797

HRH Princess Elizabeth With HRH The Prince of Wales, Cecil Beaton

HRH Princess Elizabeth With HRH The Prince of Wales

Cecil Beaton

Photography - 30 x 30 inch

$1,249

Crime scene, JXD1S

Crime scene

JXD1S

Photography - 39.4 x 39.4 x 0.1 inch

$665

Étrange Rivage 1, Hervé Dez

Étrange Rivage 1

Hervé Dez

Photography - 15.7 x 19.7 x 0 inch

$432

Goose-in-Love-with-Boy-in-Love-with-Goose ; Rumination Concerning Interspecies and Same-Sex Marriage, Erie Country fair, Hambourg, New York, Les Krims

Goose-in-Love-with-Boy-in-Love-with-Goose ; Rumination Concerning Interspecies and Same-Sex Marriage, Erie Country fair, Hambourg, New York

Les Krims

Photography - 15.2 x 19.6 x 0.2 inch

$1,329

The Basketball game, Paul Almasy

The Basketball game

Paul Almasy

Photography - 27.4 x 19.5 x 0.4 inch

$969

#Rrrabbithole Moscow, Alan Vouba

#Rrrabbithole Moscow

Alan Vouba

Photography - 4.1 x 7.9 inch

$166

Série : Berlin nord-est / arrière-cours - Kastanienallee, Manfred Paul

Série : Berlin nord-est / arrière-cours - Kastanienallee

Manfred Paul

Photography - 15.7 x 11.8 inch

$2,769

White

In physics, white is the sum of all the colours. To the human eye, white appears to be the total absence of colour. Amongst artists, white and its many uses in art are continuously evolving and challenging those who would embrace them. Is white, then, a non-colour, or an enhancer of colours? Intangible or material? Absence or excess?

Since Antiquity, white has been appreciated for its symbolic value. In Ancient Greece, where they would paint their statues, it was a sign of incompletion, whereas the Romans believed it showed pomp and imperialist virtue. With the rise of Christianity, white was used in opposition to black in order to emphasise moral dichotomies: the pure, divine white against the darkness. In some cases, however, white was used to show sickness or death, most notably in the pallid representations of the skeletal, crucified Christ.

In the Renaissance white was used to sublimate faces and backgrounds. Da Vinci even based his sfumato technique on the soft transition from light into darkness. Throughout the history of painting, white was considered precious for its ability to reflect light. It attracts the gaze even when used in the tiniest quantities, and illuminates the subject, drawing out stunning contrasts as seen in the works of Rembrandt, or in Vermeer's famous Girl with the Pearl Earring.

With the rise of Impressionism, white was used as the brightest tone amongst shades of grey. While Manet produced canvases which were forerunners to monochromes, including The Reader, which was almost pure white, Monet delivered a stunning gradient of whites whilst recreating the snow at his home in Giverny. The first true white monochrome appeared with the arrival of Malevitch's White Square on a White Background. The artist said 'I have broken the blue boundary of colour limits, and come out into the white'.

 

Modernists were equally passionate about white and valued it incredibly highly. Miro in particular questioned the status of white on canvases. In his painting Woman, Bird and Star white is in parts boldly painted, but is also distinctive for its absence around the star. Picasso, on the other hand, explored white in conjunction with his famous coloured periods. Piero Manzoni became famous thanks to his 'achromatic' paintings, a series of canvases produced exclusively in shades of white. Moving into the 20th century, white became synonymous with minimalist abstraction. For artists like Kandinsky, white was a cosmic colour, associated with a spiritual search for the absolute, guiding the artists as he seek to express his emotions.  

 

Today, white remains an ever popular subject. Roman Opalka made his name creating a series of white numbers of a white background, while Daniel Arsham reinvents white walls in galleries by letting his artwork drip down onto them. White is a colour with multiple symbolic interpretations. The colour of divinity or humility; of purity and immaculate, of emptiness and absence, but always colour. If blue has Klein and red has Rothko, it appears that no artist has yet succeeded in fully mastering white – but maybe you'll find them in our selection!


Read more